Features & Profiles World News

The Queen’s Corgis 

By Martha Ewing ’26

One thing that comes to mind when people think of Queen Elizabeth II are her corgis. These lucky pups met dignitaries and posed for photos alongside the late monarch. So what is their story, and what will happen to the remaining canine royals?

The Queen is said to have owned more than 30 dogs during her reign, most of which descended from Elizabeth’s first ever corgi, Susan, a gift for her 18th birthday in 1944.  

If it were not for Queen Elizabeth, corgis probably wouldn’t be the global sensation they are today. Perhaps it’s the idea that these dogs live in the lap of luxury that amuses people or maybe it’s because they are undeniably cute with their pointed ears and stubby legs. Whatever it is that makes people admire them, they are national treasures in the eyes of Britons and the whole world. 

The Queen was often seen strolling in her gardens with her beloved corgis trailing behind her. In fact, Princess Diana once referred to them as “a moving carpet.” People are concerned about the well-being of her remaining pets and where they will end up. 

No, the corgis will not be buried alive. There are two corgis still alive named Muick and Sandy. They will go to live with the Queen’s son Prince Andrew and his ex-wife, Sarah Ferguson, the Duchess of York, at The Royal Lodge, their country estate in Windsor. The Duchess is said to have had a close bond with the Queen, even after she split from her son. They often rode horses and walked the corgis together. After the Queen’s death on September 8th, Ms. Ferguson posted on Twitter with a message saying, “She was the most incredible mother-in-law and friend. I will always be grateful to her for the generosity she showed me in remaining close to me even after my divorce.”

It started with Susan, the first corgi, and the Queen’s 18th birthday gift. The two grew inseparable, so much so that Susan was smuggled to Broadlands, in Hampshire, by the Queen during her honeymoon with her late husband, Prince Phillip. After Susan died, at nearly 15 years old, the Royal Family started a long line of more than thirty corgis, all her descendents. Throughout the years, corgis were born with names such as Dipper, Disco, Flora, and Jay. A new breed of dog was created when one of the corgis had puppies with Princess Margaret’s dachshund Pipkin. This breed is now known as a “Dorgi.” 

Corgis are symbolic to the Royal Family and vice versa. Hopefully more dogs will descend from the remaining ones, or who knows, maybe a new dog breed will arise and a new story will unfold.

Photo curtsey CNN
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